Wired Equivalent Privacy

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Wired Equivalent Privacy is nothing but a security algorithm for the standard IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Initially it was introduced as a part of original 802.11 standards in 1997 but its intention was to provide data confidentiality comparable to the traditional wired network.

Wired Equivalent Privacy is nothing but a security algorithm for the standard IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Initially it was introduced as a part of original 802.11 standards in 1997 but its intention was to provide data confidentiality comparable to the traditional wired network.

Process of Authentication:

Generally there are two methods used for authenticating WEP:

  • Open System authentication
  • Shared key authentication

Open System authentication: The WLAN client need not provide credentials to the Access Point during authentication. So any client can authenticate with the access point and then try to associate. Suppose if no authorization occurs, WEP keys can be used for encrypting data frames. At this point of time, the client must have correct keys.

Shared Key Authentication: This will be another four step challenge

  • The client sends an authentication request to the Access Point
  • The Access Point responds with a clear text challenge
  • Thereafter, the client encrypts the challenge-text using the configured WEP key and responds with another authentication request
  • Now, the Access Point decrypts the response. So if it matches then the challenge text , Access Point replies with the positive reply
Safe and Secure
Safe and Secure
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